Henry V slider

Throughout the year, enjoy fascinating lectures, performances, and discussions about exciting topics in Shakespeare’s plays. Select from the months below for information on upcoming lectures and topics.

 

 

Shakespeare’s Monsters

Led by Jim Casey, Associate Professor of English at Arcadia University in Philadelphia
Date: Wednesday, October 10, 2018; 6pm-7pm
Location: The Free Library of Philadelphia; 1901 Vine St, Philadelphia, PA 19103 (Parkway Central Library); held in the Literature Department section
Admission: Free with advance registration
Parking: Metered street parking, and nearby garages and lots

The word “monster” in English originally referred to an animal or human child born with a birth defect; the word came directly from the Latin monstrum, which indicated a violation of natural order, an omen or warning from the gods. For Shakespeare, monsters are sometimes born—as in the case of Richard III—but most often they are made through a person’s actions. So, how does one become a monster in Shakespeare? What actions do the plays depict as monstrous? How does monstrosity appear on stage? This lecture will discuss what the word “monster” meant to Shakespeare and how modern productions have presented the very different monsters of Richard III and Caliban.

Click here to register today!

 

Shakespeare and Honor

Led by Jim Casey, Associate Professor of English at Arcadia University in Philadelphia
Date: Wednesday, November 7, 2018; 6pm-7pm
Location: The Free Library of Philadelphia; 1901 Vine St, Philadelphia, PA 19103 (Parkway Central Library); Room 108
Admission: Free with advance registration
Parking: Metered street parking, and nearby garages and lots

Variations of the word “honor” appear more than nine hundred times in Shakespeare’s plays and poems, but honor was a complex concept during the period, related to fame, family, rank, and behavior. How does that concept translate do our modern world? Was honor different for men and women during Shakespeare’s day? Could someone from the lower classes even have honor? This lecture will examine the idea of honor in Shakespeare’s plays and consider how early modern honor might be presented in twenty-first century productions.

Click here to register today!

 

*Photo by Kendall Whitehouse

Shakespeare and Love

Led by Jim Casey, Associate Professor of English at Arcadia University in Philadelphia
Date: Wednesday, January 23, 2019; 6pm-7pm
Location: The Free Library of Philadelphia; 1901 Vine St, Philadelphia, PA 19103 (Parkway Central Library); Room 405
Admission: Free with advance registration
Parking: Metered street parking, and nearby garages and lots

“What is love?” Feste sings in Twelfth Night. It is a question that Shakespeare keeps coming back to in his plays and poems. Where does love come from? How does one fall in love? Why do we become so crazy in love? What are the different kinds of love? This lecture will trace the concept of love in Shakespeare, from its classical roots, to its medieval ties to death, to its early modern poetic forms, to Shakespeare’s own performances of love on stage, in order to begin to answer the question, “What is love?”

Click here to register today!

 

*Photo by Kendall Whitehouse

Shakespeare and the Law

Led by John Culhane, Distinguished Professor of Law at Delaware Law School (Widener University), and an adjunct professor at Drexel University
Date: Wednesday, March 20, 2019; 6pm-7pm
Location: The Free Library of Philadelphia; 1901 Vine St, Philadelphia, PA 19103 (Parkway Central Library); Room 405
Admission: Free with advance registration
Parking: Metered street parking, and nearby garages and lots

It’s often said that people “bargain in the shadow of the law.” But they also write in that same legal shadow. Shakespeare’s plays are enriched by the legal culture in which they were created, but they question that culture as much as they reflect it. We’ll talk about the famous trial in The Merchant of Venice, questions of justice and mercy in Measure for Measure, and issues of authority in King Lear and Julius Caesar.

Click here to register today!

 


About the Presenters:

Jim Casey

Jim Casey is an Associate Professor of English at Arcadia University in Philadelphia. He loves all things Shakespeare and all things geeky, especially those involving the fantastic. He has published critical work on fantasy, monstrosity, early modern poetry, medieval poetry, textual theory, performance theory, postmodern theory, adaptation theory, comics, anime, masculinity, grief, old age, Shakespeare, Chaucer, and Battlestar Galactica. With Christy Desmet and Natalie Loper, he is the co-editor of Shakespeare/Not Shakespeare, a collection of essays on Shakespeare and adaptation. He will be teaching in Hungary on a Fulbright Grant during the spring and summer of 2019.

John Culhane

John Culhane is Distinguished Professor of Law at Delaware Law School (Widener University), and an adjunct professor at Drexel University, where he teaches “Shakespeare and the Law.” Author of more than three dozen law review articles, he has spoken and published on a wide variety of legal issues, is the author of the forthcoming “The Many Ties That Bind” (Vanderbilt Press), and is a regular contributor to both Politico and Slate. He has appeared on NPR and MSNBC, among other media, and has been published by the New York Times, the Philadelphia

 

Special thanks to our “Shakespeare in the World Lecture Series” Partner:

 

flp_logotype_872+black